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Probiotic and Immunity

Ancestors Says Drink Yogurt

 

Our ancestors from those days knew about probiotic. That’s where Indians eat yogurt, drink butter milk and eat food like Thosai and Idli. Eating yogurt can not only alter your gut bacteria for the better, it may also change your brain function, scientists say.
Probiotics maintain order in your digestive system by keeping bad bacteria from multiplying. When you eat food, it’s inevitable that toxins and viruses enter right along with the vitamins and minerals that are working to feed your body. Studies suggest that probiotics may aid in treating many gastrointestinal disorders, including gastroenteritis, diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease. Additionally, probiotics crowd out the bad bacteria that enter your small intestine before they can take hold in your system and cause harm.

A new study shows that probiotics can modulate immune responses via your gut‘s mucosal immune system. It was found that probiotics have an anti-inflammatory potential. They caused a decrease in serum CRP levels, and a reduction in the bacteria-induced production of proinflammatory cytokines. To build a solid foundation for your health, a good place to start is where good health begins – in your digestive tract. Many pathogens and toxins enter into your body through your skin, lungs, even your mucous membranes! However, the largest source of toxins and microbial agents come from an area that most people would not expect – your digestive system. It may seem strange to think of the digestive tract as an external organ, but that is precisely what it is.

The digestive tract has a very large surface area that comes into direct contact with our external environment, whilst providing a physical barrier to protect our internal organs from infection-causing bacteria, parasites and viruses. By eating probiotic-rich foods and maintaining the good intestinal flora, a person can also help to maintain a healthy immune system. And that has real world effects: for example, in one small study of students, those who were given a fermented dairy drink (instead of milk) displayed increased production from lymphocytes — a marker of immune response.

Some studies suggest that adding probiotics to a well-balanced diet could help you to use fewer sick days during the course of a work year.

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